Category Archives: Facebook

The best move for great #restaurant/bar #socialmedia results.

Before hiring any social media manager or company, try this for your bar / restaurant (or any retail establishment). Hire a photographer to be on location during your busy times, who will capture the action in the venue and post to social media. The problem I hear about from my clients and other bar/restaurant operators is not about HOW to post on social media, but WHAT to post. Hiring a social media agency or manager does nothing to generate exciting, original posting content! The best content for any retail business social media accounts are the cool, fun things that happen inside the venue – but you have to capture them live!  In addition to my bar/restaurant/beverage consulting firm (that includes social media consulting), I own a photo/video event services company that shoots over 400 events per year. I’ve developed quite a few techniques for utilizing photographers, and best practices for restaurant/bar content capture and sharing.  Here’s a guide for getting a good program in place to create a dominant social media presence for a venue:

  1. Personality is most important in hiring photographers. To get good photos the photographer has to be able to make customers feel comfortable and want to have fun when taking pictures. No creeps! Nobody boring or low energy!
  2. Search your staff first for a photographer. There’s a lot of creative types in the service industry. Someone who knows the venue, staff and customers is ideal. A regular may be a good photographer or know one, so ask them!
  3. Make sure the photographer fits your customer profile. As closely as possible you want the photographer to be in your ideal client demographic, so as to better relate to your concept and your best customers.
  4. Make sure the photographer is available and happy to work during the peak periods of the business.
  5. Have the photographer check in with venue private party coordinators and the hostess to learn about birthday parties and other special customer events in the venue for good photo opportunities.
  6. The work flow should be for photographer to sweep the venue engaging customers and capturing images, then go to an unobtrusive area to edit and upload images. This  should be a location where they can still see most of the room in case something exciting occurs that should be captured. This alternating work flow allows time for quick editing, instant uploading and prevents overkill of the photographer being on the floor too much, annoying people and running out of good images to capture. I suggest 50% of time on the floor 50% off, and running time can depend on what’s happening, size of crowd etc. Don’t bother scheduling photographers on slow nights, it’s a waste.
  7. Before hiring the photographer, ask them for photos of groups having fun and photos of food and drinks. If they don’t have much to show, have them come in on a night and shoot a live audition. Work with them and watch how they relate to customers, then look at their work. Personality and speed are more important than super high quality photography. The photos and video need to be attractive and eye catching, but don’t have to be masterpieces. For example food does not have to look like a restaurant chain advertisement; yummy is good enough. Skills shooting in a dimmer light level is important. Wedding photographers are great candidates for this as they know how to engage with clients but often they work Saturdays which is most venues’ best night. But winter is off season in northern areas so that creates some opportunities.
  8. The photographer needs to wear a lanyard with an ID badge so customers know it’s a representative of the venue and not some creepy picture taker!
  9. Make sure the photographer can also shoot video with their camera and is comfortable doing this. Video is equally important to photography in social media.
  10. Have a quiet area of the bar or restaurant where customer wanting to do testimonials, happy birthday messages or other positive short videos can be captured. These are priceless!
  11. Only use photographers with an active social media presence. They need to walk the walk not just talk the talk. They must demonstrate their knowledge by having a presence on every social media channel where your business is active.
  12. Have a conversation about the image the business needs to portray online to drive sales. Make sure the photographer “gets” what type of photos and videos should go on line and which should be deleted. Emphasize quality over quantity!  For those who are interested I offer an extensive list of criteria and a training guide I use for event photography and videography.
  13. Have the photographer post instantly, with no management review process. Social media sharing thrives in the moment. There’s no time for a manager or owner to go through all the images, so it’s key to have a photographer with good judgment (see #12). If the photographer can do some filters and special effects quickly that’s great, but let them know speed is priority 1. Management should look at their accounts daily and take down anything that is not appropriate. This should be rare with the right shooter and training criteria.
  14. For instant posting it’s best for the photographer to have a camera with Wi-Fi or other connectivity built in. For example I use a Canon EOS with Bluetooth and Wi-Fi built in so photos go right to my smart phone for fast editing and posting. Forget posting the next day – that’s an obsolete approach.
  15. If the venue has a larger TV matrix system several TVs can be dedicated to uploaded photos from the current day and past days – an ever changing collage of photos. The social media explosion is proof positive that people love to look at photos of themselves and their friends!
  16. Give the photographer hashtags or other tags and keywords that can be included with photos, that fit your marketing needs.
  17. You need heads up, talented, dependable, good personalities for this job, so don’t cheap out!
  18. The best restaurant social media accounts I’ve seen have a lot of owner personal involvement. If possible, ownership should be personally captured interacting with customers, hosting short videos and posting everything to active personal social media sites. This is the gold standard.
  19. Whenever possible, the photographer should caption the images when posting, with AT LEAST the venue name and taggable names of the people in the photos or video. This is key for sharing and viral action. How this is done varies from channel to channel.  Customers giving their names should be entered automatically in a contest for a generous prize so they have a chance to win something for sharing their names. If they don’t want to that’s fine, don’t push it.
  20. Every customer should get a simple business card with a link to view the photos and download or share.
  21. Don’t just shoot customer and food/beverage photos. Remember the staff is a huge part of any good venue’s appeal. If the photographer has a good personality the staff will engage and you’ll get a lot of fun photos of staff with each other and with customers. Let the staff tag themselves. Don’t auto tag them as many staff members are worried about stalkers, their full time day job etc. I’ve seem many programs fall apart due to mishandling staff involvement. Owners tend to assume staff members want to promote themselves online at their hospitality jobs, and will BE the social media department for the venue. This is wishful thinking and I’ve never seen it happen. Staff can be a part of a program run by the venue; they will never be your prime social media drivers. FYI short cut takers.
  22. Have the photographer do head shots for all staff they can use on their own. Everyone needs one! Also have the photographers shoot general room shots, empty and full, along with B Roll video of the venue. These may or may not be good enough for advertising, media or private party brochures, but it’s a free throw to get some generic shots when the photographer is there anyway.
  23. Have more than 1 photographer in rotation, and have a back up every night. Work with an agency if you have to. Marketing through social media is just as important as any other job. You wouldn’t have no hostess, don’t miss a busy night with your photographer. That will be the night something amazing happens and you’ll miss it!
  24. Have a sign posted as people enter the venue that they may be recorded or photographed and entry constitutes agreement to share their image. I have some good ones just ask me if needed. If anyone contacts you objecting to their image being on social media, take it down right away, and ask them to confirm by email that their complaint has been resolved.
  25. Make sure bands and entertainers sign a waiver allowing their images, audio and video to be used for venue promotion.
  26. The photographer needs to sign a contractor waiver and agree they are responsible for their own equipment and anything that happens relating to them while at the venue. It’s best if they have insurance but most do not.
  27. Run your plan by a local attorney to see if there are any restrictions or risks in your local area that need to be considered.

If you have a photographer shooting and posting photos and video on every busy night, I am 100% sure you will have the best social media presence among your competitors. Very few are going the extra mile to do this right, so it’s a huge potential competitive advantage.

I’m happy to help design your program just contact me here. Happy shooting!

Tim

We need explosive growth in this business…

After watching numerous live webcasts on Facebook, Periscope, Meerkat, Snapchat etc. the world desperately needs an explosion in Extemporaneous Public Speaking Courses. It’s painful to watch people stumble over their words and thoughts. No one really has time to listen to meandering awkward remarks. There’s little entertainment value. Get it together webcasters!

Yes I’ll try it and put my money where my mouth is. Maybe take that course first though.

Cheers!

— Tim

Here’s a ticketing idea that’s more fair to fans, #BlackhawksRally

Facebook or Twitter should develop ticket purchase validation technology that could be used for events like the Hawks rally tomorrow in Chicago, where scalpers scooped up so many of the free tickets and are selling them online for $100 or more.

There must be a way to help real fans get most of the tickets by authorizing purchases through matching with Facebook profiles and activity.

scalping_dmb_tickets

#Blackhawks Rally #ChicagoBlackhawks #StanleyCup #SoldierField #Scalpers #Chicago

 

http://wp.me/p2g9q8-BY

 

8 Unique Features of the New Facebook Wallet.

Facebook wants to be your wallet, reportedly developing a system for allowing monetary transfers and eventually retail purchases directly through Facebook apps.  Here are some of the features I expect to see in the new “Facebook Wallet”:

1. Everything you buy also belongs to Facebook.
2. You have to run two different apps, “Facebook Wallet” and also “Walletssenger,” one to pay the purchase price and one to pay the sales tax.
3. With Facebook Wallet, you can only make purchases at stores you visit at least weekly.
4. Every one of your friends can tag, rate and comment on each of your purchases.
5. You build up your credit rating for years, then Facebook Wallet will wipe out all your credit information without notice, and you’ll have to change your name and start over.
6. The price you pay for an item is determined by how many other people want it.
7. The list of stores where Facebook Wallet works changes daily without notification.
8. There’s no customer service phone number.

I’m sure I’m missing a few great ideas so feel free to send me some suggestions, and happy FaceShopping…

Merchants of Negativity

I admit I still haven’t kicked 100% of these negative influences, but I’ve eliminated a lot!  And the more I cut down, the happier and more effective I am in life and business.  Fuel your brain with positivity and action, not armchair negativity, to achieve prosperity!

Merchants of Negativity

Political Websites and TV

Internet Forums and Comments

Violent and negative TV shows and movies

Talk Radio

Yelp

Facebook

They make money through spreading Negativity; you lose money by giving them your time.

 

What is the best Restau-Bar “Online Content”?

In the online world the axiom is:  Content is King!

But in the restaurant and bar business “content” is the guest experience in our establishments and our on site activities/promotions. Social media is a great amplifier but if there’s nothing interesting on our menus and promotional calendars, and we are not capturing fun customer experiences and interesting activities in our locations, viral social media will never happen.

What happens and is captured in the four walls is the key to a great social media presence.

Posting is the easy part.  Creating something worth posting is the trick.  Garbage in garbage out!

A-List Marketing can help develop techniques to create and capture RestauBar activities that are fun, interesting and potentially viral.