Category Archives: Restaurant and Bar Biz

What We All Lose If Tipping Is Eliminated

Updated 9-18-16

~ Prices will go up more than 20% . Trust me, they’ll have to. So customers will pay more at any place that’s even moderately popular.

~ Good servers at most places will make less money as the net wage hike will not cover the lost tips. The majority of servers I know are strongly against getting rid of tips.

~ Operators will lose as higher menu prices will decrease customer visits and spending.  ~ Most sadly, another one of the rare person to person relationships left in our social life will vanish.
~ Based on my past as a tipped server in the past, and my years in many different aspects of the hospitality business, in concepts from low to high end, I think this is a mistake across the board.

~ Everyone will lose if we get rid of tipping.

Here’s a 9-18-16 update from the Chicago Tribune on how the no-tipping experiment is failing.

a tipster not just a hipster tip sign

 

Be Careful What You Wish For, Anti-Tipping Crowd

A Massachusetts Court ruled a Dunkin Donuts that has prominent signs saying that tips are not accepted can keep any money left on the counters and not give it to employees. Not my style of good morale management, but I can’t fault the court. If there’s “no tipping” than money left on the counter cannot by definition be a tip!
If you don’t like that logic than perhaps we are all better off preserving the personal touch of encouraging tips instead of taking another step toward a society with minimal human interaction.
As someone who earned the money to start out in life as a tipped employee, I say Long Live Tipping!
Read more here in Grub Street about this ruling.

Want help dealing with trends and challenges in restaurant and bar service?  Shoot us a note and have a free consultation!  Or join us on Facebook and Twitter to ask any questions!

Jim Carrey: My Waiter Job

“Doing what you don’t want is the way to what you do want, on occasion.”
“Compromise is the way to get to what you want.”
“I would never have made it without going back and doing what I didn’t want to do.”
Words of wisdom and an inspiring video from Jim Carrey.

#TBT People love our food so much they take photos to send their friends!

~~ Imagine how thrilled we would have been 15 years ago if a customer had brought a camera to our restaurant, taken photos of our food and mailed the pictures to all their friends with a note on how delicious it was and what a good time they were having?  #TBT

~~ So how NUTS are restaurant managers, owners, chefs and service staff to complain about people snapping food photos at dinner and sharing them?

~~ Food (pictures) for Thought.  — TTBG

 

Top 10 Reasons for Bar / Restaurant Failure and 5 Solutions

UPDATED :: In over 10 years as a key player in more than 40 successful openings and long term success of bars, restaurants and nightclubs, I have seen a lot of competitors fail.  As much as I’d like to claim we “killed the competition,” often they actually kill themselves, sometimes before they even open.

Following are the Top 10 key reasons bars, restaurants and nightclubs fail. We are currently offering a free consultation to help in any areas needed!

TOP 10 REASONS FOR FAILURE

(1) The restaurateur/owner does not understand what business they are actually in. Their fantasy does not match the reality of running a successful operation. No one thinks they can hang a sign and have a dental practice with no training because they brush their teeth every day, but many people think they can launch and run a restaurant or bar because they like to go out for dinner and drinks, or maybe they worked in a bar for a while.  There’s much more needed to succeed.

(2) Typically when developing the restaurant too much is spent on construction, equipment and decor and not enough on staffing, training and marketing. Many new owners love to spend on “things” and are reluctant to spend on people which are the #1 key to a good guest experience.

(3) Careful research is not done prior to opening on politics in the community, and vital relationships are not forged with people in local power positions (over your liquor license and inspections for example!) Particularly, beverage driven venues can set themselves up for constant trouble from authorities once they are open. “Connected” experts are needed on the team, as no single person or owner knows enough about the various players and issues. This is survival stuff that all too few pay enough attention to!

(4) Concept Development is not led by someone with a successful track record of launching multiple bars and restaurants, so the right concept is not chosen to fit the demands of the market and the team fails to maximize the best opportunities to make money at the particular site and in the various desired target markets.

(5) Four walls marketing (inside the venue) and generating repeat business are given minimal attention when they should be the most important two parts of the marketing mix after opening.

(6) Lights, music, atmosphere (temperature/comfort) are not consistent and appealing. These are simple basics yet hard to maintain. Circling back to point (1), many who open restaurants don’t realize it’s the details that make or break you.

Continue reading Top 10 Reasons for Bar / Restaurant Failure and 5 Solutions

Hospitality Business Hit Hard by Falling Millennial Wages.

Many hospitality business leaders and local operators are pulling their hair out over why traffic, sales and profits are falling at most bars and beverage driven restaurants. One big reason is a huge drop in the earning power of our primary market – young people. Read about it here, and here, very helpful in understanding the factors driving recent troublesome trends in sales and customer spending patterns.

At A-List we specialize in helping operators beat the trends toward discounting and lower margins by creating an exciting environment with exceptional customer experiences, that beats the competition in the war for customers’ shrinking entertainment budgets.

 

 

 

 

Why our Customers are not “Guests”

It’s been a restaurant/bar industry trend for quite a few years now to refer to customers as “guests.”  It has spread to other retailers as well.  I have frequently used this description myself.

We all like the sound of “guests;” it appeals to the welcoming  instincts of the retail and hospitality trade.  The problem is that it’s not really accurate.

  1. A guest traditionally does not pay, whereas a customer of a business does.
  2. A guest is expected to be grateful and appreciative of a host’s hospitality.
  3. A guest implies a temporary interaction.

I think using “guest” as a description can lead a hospitality professional into having the wrong attitude toward their customers.

I believe the word “patrons” is the best description we can use in the hospitality business for our desired customers, much more accurate and focused than “guests,” or “customers.”

  1. It emphasizes that we are dependent on the “patron” to financially support our business, which is true and should never be forgotten.
  2. Whereas “guests” owe thanks to their “hosts,” we as hospitality operators should always be grateful for our “patrons” support, which allows us to prosper in business.
  3. “Patron” implies a longer term relationship, which we should all be striving for with customers.
  4. A “Patron Focused Mentality” directs our attention to the customers that spend to actually support our business; not all “guests” are equally valuable.  A person can be a customer and yet not be very beneficial to a business if they are cheap, don’t visit regularly, or absorb an unprofitable amount of time, attention and resources.   The word “patron” comes closer in meaning to describing someone who is truly beneficial (profitable) to the business.

Using the word “patron” captures the precise meaning of the customers we want and value, and allows us to differentiate them from run of the mill customers or “guests,” who may or may not be valuable.

Using the more accurate term helps us never forget to thank our patrons consistently for their patronage, and work hard to have a long term profitable relationship with our patrons!

And as an unrelated fact, Patron is a heck of a good tequila! 

Cheers — TTBG