Tag Archives: Restaurants

If banks were restaurants they’d all go out of business.

Dear banks,

We’ve noticed as you merge and grow your customer service goes down the drain.

You replace most of the experienced people we’ve gotten to know with barely trained robotic staff.

You make up rules that don’t exist and aren’t consistent branch to branch.

You use fraud protection as an excuse for bad service and no common sense.

You’d really prefer not to have lobbies or provide any services other than selling us stuff.

The only way for a business owner like myself to efficiently and pleasantly do business with a bank to pick one branch and only go to that one branch. Get to know the people so they can make “exceptions” that shouldn’t have to be exceptions. It’s like having to know the doorman at a nightclub!

When you merge, your original shareholders tend to get short-changed unless they are bank management.

If an independent restaurant grew into a chain the way banks do, they’d go out of business.

Then again, restaurants aren’t bailed out by taxpayers when they make bad decisions!

 

 

 

Restaurants can attract Pokemon Go players for 99 cents by “dropping a lure.”

Restaurants and other businesses are loading the monster new mobile game Pokemon Go to find out if their location is part of the game or near a spot which is a goal for players to visit. There’s no way to pay to be a location, but you can purchase “lures” within the game that attract the virtual creatures that inhabit the game, and thus attract real players that could be customers.

Read about this crazy popular game and how businesses are making themselves part of it here.

Here’s more details on exactly how dropping a lure can work for stores near “Pokestops.” Courtesy of Restaurant News and @RonRuggless.

 

 

The best move for great #restaurant/bar #socialmedia results.

Before hiring any social media manager or company, try this for your bar / restaurant (or any retail establishment). Hire a photographer to be on location during your busy times, who will capture the action in the venue and post to social media. The problem I hear about from my clients and other bar/restaurant operators is not about HOW to post on social media, but WHAT to post. Hiring a social media agency or manager does nothing to generate exciting, original posting content! The best content for any retail business social media accounts are the cool, fun things that happen inside the venue – but you have to capture them live!  In addition to my bar/restaurant/beverage consulting firm (that includes social media consulting), I own a photo/video event services company that shoots over 400 events per year. I’ve developed quite a few techniques for utilizing photographers, and best practices for restaurant/bar content capture and sharing.  Here’s a guide for getting a good program in place to create a dominant social media presence for a venue:

  1. Personality is most important in hiring photographers. To get good photos the photographer has to be able to make customers feel comfortable and want to have fun when taking pictures. No creeps! Nobody boring or low energy!
  2. Search your staff first for a photographer. There’s a lot of creative types in the service industry. Someone who knows the venue, staff and customers is ideal. A regular may be a good photographer or know one, so ask them!
  3. Make sure the photographer fits your customer profile. As closely as possible you want the photographer to be in your ideal client demographic, so as to better relate to your concept and your best customers.
  4. Make sure the photographer is available and happy to work during the peak periods of the business.
  5. Have the photographer check in with venue private party coordinators and the hostess to learn about birthday parties and other special customer events in the venue for good photo opportunities.
  6. The work flow should be for photographer to sweep the venue engaging customers and capturing images, then go to an unobtrusive area to edit and upload images. This  should be a location where they can still see most of the room in case something exciting occurs that should be captured. This alternating work flow allows time for quick editing, instant uploading and prevents overkill of the photographer being on the floor too much, annoying people and running out of good images to capture. I suggest 50% of time on the floor 50% off, and running time can depend on what’s happening, size of crowd etc. Don’t bother scheduling photographers on slow nights, it’s a waste.
  7. Before hiring the photographer, ask them for photos of groups having fun and photos of food and drinks. If they don’t have much to show, have them come in on a night and shoot a live audition. Work with them and watch how they relate to customers, then look at their work. Personality and speed are more important than super high quality photography. The photos and video need to be attractive and eye catching, but don’t have to be masterpieces. For example food does not have to look like a restaurant chain advertisement; yummy is good enough. Skills shooting in a dimmer light level is important. Wedding photographers are great candidates for this as they know how to engage with clients but often they work Saturdays which is most venues’ best night. But winter is off season in northern areas so that creates some opportunities.
  8. The photographer needs to wear a lanyard with an ID badge so customers know it’s a representative of the venue and not some creepy picture taker!
  9. Make sure the photographer can also shoot video with their camera and is comfortable doing this. Video is equally important to photography in social media.
  10. Have a quiet area of the bar or restaurant where customer wanting to do testimonials, happy birthday messages or other positive short videos can be captured. These are priceless!
  11. Only use photographers with an active social media presence. They need to walk the walk not just talk the talk. They must demonstrate their knowledge by having a presence on every social media channel where your business is active.
  12. Have a conversation about the image the business needs to portray online to drive sales. Make sure the photographer “gets” what type of photos and videos should go on line and which should be deleted. Emphasize quality over quantity!  For those who are interested I offer an extensive list of criteria and a training guide I use for event photography and videography.
  13. Have the photographer post instantly, with no management review process. Social media sharing thrives in the moment. There’s no time for a manager or owner to go through all the images, so it’s key to have a photographer with good judgment (see #12). If the photographer can do some filters and special effects quickly that’s great, but let them know speed is priority 1. Management should look at their accounts daily and take down anything that is not appropriate. This should be rare with the right shooter and training criteria.
  14. For instant posting it’s best for the photographer to have a camera with Wi-Fi or other connectivity built in. For example I use a Canon EOS with Bluetooth and Wi-Fi built in so photos go right to my smart phone for fast editing and posting. Forget posting the next day – that’s an obsolete approach.
  15. If the venue has a larger TV matrix system several TVs can be dedicated to uploaded photos from the current day and past days – an ever changing collage of photos. The social media explosion is proof positive that people love to look at photos of themselves and their friends!
  16. Give the photographer hashtags or other tags and keywords that can be included with photos, that fit your marketing needs.
  17. You need heads up, talented, dependable, good personalities for this job, so don’t cheap out!
  18. The best restaurant social media accounts I’ve seen have a lot of owner personal involvement. If possible, ownership should be personally captured interacting with customers, hosting short videos and posting everything to active personal social media sites. This is the gold standard.
  19. Whenever possible, the photographer should caption the images when posting, with AT LEAST the venue name and taggable names of the people in the photos or video. This is key for sharing and viral action. How this is done varies from channel to channel.  Customers giving their names should be entered automatically in a contest for a generous prize so they have a chance to win something for sharing their names. If they don’t want to that’s fine, don’t push it.
  20. Every customer should get a simple business card with a link to view the photos and download or share.
  21. Don’t just shoot customer and food/beverage photos. Remember the staff is a huge part of any good venue’s appeal. If the photographer has a good personality the staff will engage and you’ll get a lot of fun photos of staff with each other and with customers. Let the staff tag themselves. Don’t auto tag them as many staff members are worried about stalkers, their full time day job etc. I’ve seem many programs fall apart due to mishandling staff involvement. Owners tend to assume staff members want to promote themselves online at their hospitality jobs, and will BE the social media department for the venue. This is wishful thinking and I’ve never seen it happen. Staff can be a part of a program run by the venue; they will never be your prime social media drivers. FYI short cut takers.
  22. Have the photographer do head shots for all staff they can use on their own. Everyone needs one! Also have the photographers shoot general room shots, empty and full, along with B Roll video of the venue. These may or may not be good enough for advertising, media or private party brochures, but it’s a free throw to get some generic shots when the photographer is there anyway.
  23. Have more than 1 photographer in rotation, and have a back up every night. Work with an agency if you have to. Marketing through social media is just as important as any other job. You wouldn’t have no hostess, don’t miss a busy night with your photographer. That will be the night something amazing happens and you’ll miss it!
  24. Have a sign posted as people enter the venue that they may be recorded or photographed and entry constitutes agreement to share their image. I have some good ones just ask me if needed. If anyone contacts you objecting to their image being on social media, take it down right away, and ask them to confirm by email that their complaint has been resolved.
  25. Make sure bands and entertainers sign a waiver allowing their images, audio and video to be used for venue promotion.
  26. The photographer needs to sign a contractor waiver and agree they are responsible for their own equipment and anything that happens relating to them while at the venue. It’s best if they have insurance but most do not.
  27. Run your plan by a local attorney to see if there are any restrictions or risks in your local area that need to be considered.

If you have a photographer shooting and posting photos and video on every busy night, I am 100% sure you will have the best social media presence among your competitors. Very few are going the extra mile to do this right, so it’s a huge potential competitive advantage.

I’m happy to help design your program just contact me here. Happy shooting!

Tim

Now can we retire the “McDonald’s is Dying” stories forever?

I’m Lovin’ It! I’ve spent the last year calling BS on the argument that McDonalds is dying off. Every few years this story comes along when sales or the stock price dips. Every time it’s been market hysteria, click baiting and wishful thinking. Today we see with a few tweaks sales are up and share price is soaring to all time highs.
Keep in mind McDonald’s has the resources and experience to create the best systems and recruit the top minds in the food service business. They are not going away anytime ever.

While I am at it, those who attack the nutritional content of McDonald’s food should compare their published nutritional data with an analysis of the hipster fast feeders such as Shake Shack, In N Out, Chipotle etc. I believe a Big Mac has a lot less fat and calories than the most popular items on many menus that get a pass on health criticism. On the run, I’m good with an Egg McMuffin (no cheese) or a Quarter Pounder.  I don’t feel like taking a nap afterward like I would with Five Guys.

Check out the specifics on McDonald’s latest results here.  And even the enemies of fast food admit it here.

Eat a balanced diet and McDonald’s won’t hurt you now and then. Poutine will kill ya a lot faster!

Cheers – Tim

mcdonalds-breakfast
All day breakfast has been one of the ingredients in McDonald’s tasty sales uptick.

http://wp.me/p2g9q8-Fr

 

 

Restaurant / Bar Idea : Promote Thru Your WiFi

I believe SmartWiFi is a great idea for bars, restaurants and other businesses.  Run your loyalty program and customer discount offers on the WiFi that customers use in the establishment!  I haven’t figured out the best service yet but here’s a few that are out there.

Pharo Social (video explaining concept and linking to Social Media)

GoZone

Wavespot

ZenReach

Turnstyle

Let me know your thoughts, any operators that are using these or considering.

Cheers!

Tim

 

http://wp.me/p2g9q8-F3

 

 

 

 

SURPRISE! Raising Wages = Higher Prices.

Chipotle just raised its prices in San Francisco 14%, exactly the same % as the raise in wages with the new minimum wage in the city. A popular chain like Chipotle has the option to do this, while most Mom and Pop restaurants and less trendy chains typically cannot raise prices.   They (we) just have to take a 14% hit.

There is no willingness of consumers to pay a little more so their fellow citizens who work in food service can make a living wage. Instead, “the dollar store mentality” rules with most customers. The lowest prices for the fattest burritos and self-throat-cutting “deals” drive sales. Thus, small businesses seem likely to lose out and possibly go out of business under the new inflationary scenario where operating costs rise but prices mostly cannot.

One lesson to be learned from Chipotle is great branding and marketing can help a business weather the storm.  Every business needs to give customers a compelling reason to look beyond the lowest prices.   Great marketing and branding can attract a high number of less price sensitive customers.  Volume plus profit margins equals survival in a time of rising costs!  This is something we are happy to say we’ve been able to help with for more than 40 hospitality locations.  Shoot us a note at A-List Marketing for a free consultation on how to beat rising costs and cheap customers.  It’s the only way to cover the ever rising costs in our businesses!

I liked this “Take Part” article about the Chipotle price hikes, as the writer seems shocked at basic economics.

Have a great day and enjoy every burrito! — TTBG

PS – I just want to add since I saw this – if you don’t tip because the minimum wage went up, you are a cheap ass.  You are not doing it on principle, you are a cheap ass.

http://wp.me/p2g9q8-CS

 

Be Careful What You Wish For, Anti-Tipping Crowd

A Massachusetts Court ruled a Dunkin Donuts that has prominent signs saying that tips are not accepted can keep any money left on the counters and not give it to employees. Not my style of good morale management, but I can’t fault the court. If there’s “no tipping” than money left on the counter cannot by definition be a tip!
If you don’t like that logic than perhaps we are all better off preserving the personal touch of encouraging tips instead of taking another step toward a society with minimal human interaction.
As someone who earned the money to start out in life as a tipped employee, I say Long Live Tipping!
Read more here in Grub Street about this ruling.

Want help dealing with trends and challenges in restaurant and bar service?  Shoot us a note and have a free consultation!  Or join us on Facebook and Twitter to ask any questions!